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An Extremely Proud Mum and Dad

We are such a proud mum and dad of two girls with autism and SPD.

We have been at Keilor Heights Primary for three years now and we have never attended a Family Welcome Picnic.  Our girls anxiety is the main reason for us not attending the previous years.  However this year the girls wanted to attend.  Half of me was thinking this is great that they want to go but the other part of me was thinking how long we will last.

We arrived with excitement in the air and then……………………………………………………………………………………

We had to let go of our own anxieties and watch with such pride that they both went off with their friends.  Emma came back for cuddles and reassurance but they both were nice and confident to mix with others.

Lessons From a Half Marathon

Grace at half marathon  One goal I have had for approximately 6 months was to complete a half marathon (definitely bit off more than I could chew with this goal).  I found it challenging remaining motivated after a while and then it did not help to have the flu for a good three weeks.  The day before the Shepparton half marathon Grace also had her first calisthenics competition but that is for another post.  But all I could think about how selfish I was for dragging them to Shepparton after such a hectic Saturday.  But I was determined to do this race mainly to tick it off my goal list so I do not have to worry about it anymore.

Then on race day poor Emma was bitten all over by bugs in her bed so she was definitely not a happy camper and I felt even worse for doing this race.  But I managed, with Steve’s support, to get to the starting line.

 

 

From the minute the person said go I was given a lot of lessons about myself and I thought I would take the time to share them with you.

  • In my head I knew that I would pretty much have to walk the distance as I had not recovered from the flu but I was not prepared to be walking by myself and everyone else had run off.  Steve must have known how I would feel about being “last” and messaged me to keep going.
  • I was not really prepared for being pushed off the track by inconsiderate runners as I had every right to be there.  But it helped me to steal myself to keep my line.
  • I was not prepared for how much of the walk was going to test my mind set but I found this helpful because I challenged the thoughts of stopping as I felt I was not good enough.  But I kept going.
  • About half way I noticed that I could hardly bend my right hand fingers and I looked at them and realised that my whole right arm was swollen and double the side.  Now this would have been the perfect time to quit with a good excuse but the first thing I thought was I’m not going to stop because I was half way through the event.
  • I realised how important it is stop and give my loved ones a kiss as they were out there waiting for me and just spending a minute helped me top up to get me to the end.  I knew there were cheering me on.  Steve also stops when he is racing to have a cuddle with the girl even if he was racing well as nothing is more important as family. I also saw the lead of the marathon stop for a cuddle with his child.
  • It was inspiring to see a 70 year old power walking the marathon so at least I was not the only one walking.
  • It was inspiring to see a guy with a physical disability completing the marathon as well.
  • My feet started to kill (its three days after the marathon and I am struggling walking on the massive blood blisters and knowing that I might loose a toe nail) but I kept going.
  • My personal trainer also came and found me after he finished and walked the rest of the way with me (thank god he had some juice on him as the tank was empty) and I felt that he really teaches the importance of being a team and helping each other out.
  • I did not give up and I crossed the line at 3:15 and it was a PB by 15 minutes.
  • I am stronger than what I give myself credit for.

 

 

 

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